Week 11: Black and White

Alison

My ride or die.

Daniel

Not many people have been able to pull off the white sock/black shoe combo since Michael Jackson but I’m glad this lady tried it, and if you squint it kinda looks like she’s moonwalking. Hee-hee.

Debbie


It seemed almost sacrilegious to take a photo of my magnificent magnolia flowers in black and white, but I must say I was surprised at how much I liked the end result.  Black and white has a certain power; I feel the magnolia’s beauty shines through.

Grant

It’s Black and White. (it’s clear)

Not always, but in this case maybe.

Mel

Shapes and light are made for black and white. There’s also a few shades of grey in here but not 50, I checked.

Sharon

If you squint a little it looks like these figures are cut out of the clouds. These were part of the sculpture exhibition at the Tesselaar Tulip Festival.

Tim

I’d been on the lookout all week for just the right mix of tone, textures, and lines. All to no avail. But then, bright and early on Friday morning as we busied ourselves in the studio, I paused to look outside, and found them there waiting…

Next week…

Our week 12 theme is: The kitchen…

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Week 10: Photographer’s Choice

Alison

Someone lovely whose photo I have never taken before and would like to take again.

Daniel

It was the big arrow that got my attention, yelling at me from across the street “THIS WAY… OVER HERE!” I wasn’t sure what it was pointing to. Then as I got closer it lowered its voice as if in secret and said “There’s a photo here somewhere”. I had no reason to distrust my new pointy friend so I lifted the camera and pressed the button.

Debbie


When I questioned the theme of Photographer’s choice, while being away from home for the week, my sister’s advice was take a photo of something I wouldn’t find at home. So obviously I chose Mt Warning as my model! The iconic cane fields provide a natural frame to this special place.

Grant

My partner is puzzling over what to bid next – the bidding so far 1H, 2D, 2H, 2S, 3H, 3NT, Pass.

What does it all mean?

What should she bid?

Mel

Probably not the best footwear to be go jumping in puddles with.

Sharon

Lincoln’s beautiful eyelashes caught my attention one day last week when I was visiting and I was thrilled that I managed to catch him in a rare quiet moment (given that when I asked if I could take his photo he said ‘nope’ and wandered off).

Tim

Lately I’ve had cause to be trawling back through my old images. I dusted off the old hard drive, plugged it in, and took a trip back to other times, other places. I fixed on a whole body of work that I did back in 2007, for my first solo exhibition, which was all skies and glorious clouds and calm water. I decided to get back to that style, back to where this all began for me. Luckily, Port Phillip Bay was happy to oblige (although it did take the ship a little while to edge into position)…

Next week…

Our week 11 theme is: black and white…

Week 9: The letter D

Alison

D is for Driving Dog, D-D-D.

Daniel

D is for detail.

Debbie


Double D – I’m hiding; can you see me?

Grant

By coincidence the theme D coincides with a trip to the Dentist, the first appointment of two related to having a crown. William, the dentist, was very happy to participate in this 52 Weeks activity, as was his assistant Simone. The most fun I’ve had at the dentist for a long time, although the cost took away some of the fun.

Mel

Diggers dig things; they make childhood dreams come true; they made money for us to buy our house; they make a lot of mess; but most of all, they make the other half smile like he’s a kid in a sandpit every day.

Sharon

D is for dumbbells. (You did see them, didn’t you?)

Tim

The delicate dance of decline and decay…

Next week…

Our week 10 theme is: Photographer’s choice…

Week 8: Old fashioned/Vintage

Alison

We found this tin at the market in Epping Forest one Saturday. I had a love-hate relationship with Weetbix as a child (unlike my brother who could take down at least ten in a morning) but I’ve come to appreciate them recently. The wholegrain kind. With fruit and yogurt and almond milk (a far cry from a begrudging two with full cream milk and a tablespoon of sugar! Children of the nineties).

Daniel

After new age bartenders started taking liberties and getting too creative behind the bar during the early 1800’s, the purists started asking for something a bit more old-fashioned. The name stuck. This is a bourbon Old Fashioned, made without song and dance, without flair, just bourbon stirred with sugar and bitters. It doesn’t have Facebook, it doesn’t care for instagram likes.

Debbie


These ribbons are so old-fashioned even I don’t know what they’re used for! I’m thinking craft??  I love the colours, the setting and the display. They just say old-fashioned to me.

Grant

My trusty Ferguson TEA 20 – known widely as a Grey Fergie – a well known vintage tractor and highly sought after by tractor enthusiasts/restorers.

Mel

Vintage lighthouses are scattered along the English coastline like little fairy lights, ushering the ships along for safe passage.

Sharon

It’s funny how a satin-lined box languishing in the bottom drawer, containing six silver cake forks, can bring back so many vivid memories of family celebrations; of laughing at the old-fashioned-ness of them, even all those years ago. But here they are – still in the family, still a source of wonder. I might have to organise a tea party!

Tim

When it comes to cakes, nothing says old-fashioned quite like that perennial favourite, the Neenish tart. Simple. Refined. Delicate. A fluffy, creamy centre, under the slightly brittle surface of the icing. Other cakes have come and gone, but the Neenish tart stands proud atop a pile of once-trendy cronuts, unicorn cupcakes, and chia puddings. Excuse me, I’ll be back in a minute – I’m suddenly hungry…

Next week…

Our week 9 theme is: The letter D…

Week 7: Lollies/sweets/candy

Alison

Sundays, sisters, and sweets.

Daniel

Imagine if Lady Liberty was holding a giant neon ice cream like this one. Imagine the smiles she would have garnered from the millions of immigrants fleeing oppression in Europe, exhausted from the long journey, stepping up onto the deck as they sailed into New York Harbour for the first time, the bitter November wind stinging their faces, looking up to see the neoclassical copper beauty, illuminated softserve in hand, welcoming them to their new home. What a welcome that would be.

Debbie


Manna – this is a ‘sweet treat’ bushtucker style. It is the excretions from the sugar lurp bug, which then turns into a sweet tasting coconut style flake. It’s found on the back of gum leaves and we just scraped it off and ate it straight up.  It is delicious – tastes very sweet and is high in protein, making it the perfect snack.

The word ‘manna’ means snow in the Adnyamathanha language as it resembles a snowflake.  An interesting fun fact – the words ‘manna from heaven’ also appear in the bible.

Grant

Nature’s violet crumble as described to me by one of our camping out guides Ubba (Murray), while walking down the Frome River. Ubba is deaf but is able to express himself very confidently with hand movements and his infectious smile. He took great delight in telling me that these rocks would be good to chomp on. (We were near a very spiritual place, I am unsure whether he meant that ancient spirits ate these rocks.)

Mel

It’s so good that m likes hanging out with m so much.

Sharon

My cup (my very big levitating cup) runneth over!

Tim

One is simply never too old for lolly teeth…

Next week…

Our week 8 theme is: Old-fashioned/vintage/antique…

Week 6: The natural world

Alison

Those tracks in the sand belong to me and a group of funny lovelies who shared 17km with me on Saturday.

Daniel

Roses are red
My car is green
But you can’t tell that
From this photo.

Debbie


The Adnyamathanha are the rock people, so it’s only fitting that as I’m here in their country, I share a photo of engravings (petroglyphs) dating back 45000+ years. They are a people at one with nature. This lizard is just one example in the natural world ‘art gallery’ in the Red Gorge, hidden away in the Flinders Ranges. Such an amazing place with engravings of animals, tracks, footprints, circles and people, everywhere we looked.

Grant

A yellow footed rock wallaby on a rocky outcrop above the Iga Warta Cultural Centre. These wallabies were facing extinction but they are coming back in Adnyamathanha land because they have removed the stock from the land and they are eliminating the feral animals (there are also plenty of kangaroo and emu, but unfortunately lots of goats).

Mel

Just in case you need a snack on your walk in the wilderness or in my case a snack on your walk through the hedged lane to the supermarket.

Sharon

One thing I love about the natural world is the moments of delicacy that catch me by surprise. We lumber around in heavy cars and trains and trams, our footpaths stream with people, our rivers and streams teem with life, our gardens burst with richness and colour … and then, amongst a bunch of native flowers, there’s the quiet and stillness of this delicate beauty.

Tim

It’s just a flower. It’s simple. But hidden in that simplicity is a world of complexity; patterns, colours, textures, contrasts. It asks for nothing, and yet offers so much. We just need to look a little more closely, a little more quietly…

Next week…

Our week 7 theme is: Lollies/candy/sweets

Week 5: Up close

Alison

We returned to Tassie for Owen’s first birthday party this weekend. He was very (VERY) happy to be eating chocolate cake with blue icing and smarties. Happy birthday, my favourite boy.

Daniel

Objects in the rear view mirror may appear closer than they are.

Debbie


This is what ‘up close’ looks like in a wine cellar at Chateau Tanunda in the Barossa Valley.

Grant

Up close with a cephalopod. This fossil, in a spherical ball of black mudstone, comes from the Kali Gandaki drainage, located on the western side of the Annapurna massif in Nepal. These little black balls are for sale everywhere in Pokhara (Nepal), but not all reveal a fossil when cracked open.

Mel

Getting up close to Bruce who is over the moon that there are bars between us as he really doesn’t like it when you try and get up close to give him cuddles. Cuddles are for girls, not for Bruces.

Sharon

On our flight to Tasmania on Friday, I looked out of the window and was struck by how up-close the wing was!

Tim

We are squeezed together on the train, up close to the windows, up close to the seats, up close to the walls, up close to each other. The window is the only respite; a view of open space and sky. And then even that view is replaced, up close to another train, more people, and even less personal space…

Next week…

Our week 6 theme is: The natural world…