Week 8: Old fashioned/Vintage

Alison

We found this tin at the market in Epping Forest one Saturday. I had a love-hate relationship with Weetbix as a child (unlike my brother who could take down at least ten in a morning) but I’ve come to appreciate them recently. The wholegrain kind. With fruit and yogurt and almond milk (a far cry from a begrudging two with full cream milk and a tablespoon of sugar! Children of the nineties).

Daniel

After new age bartenders started taking liberties and getting too creative behind the bar during the early 1800’s, the purists started asking for something a bit more old-fashioned. The name stuck. This is a bourbon Old Fashioned, made without song and dance, without flair, just bourbon stirred with sugar and bitters. It doesn’t have Facebook, it doesn’t care for instagram likes.

Debbie


These ribbons are so old-fashioned even I don’t know what they’re used for! I’m thinking craft??  I love the colours, the setting and the display. They just say old-fashioned to me.

Grant

My trusty Ferguson TEA 20 – known widely as a Grey Fergie – a well known vintage tractor and highly sought after by tractor enthusiasts/restorers.

Mel

Vintage lighthouses are scattered along the English coastline like little fairy lights, ushering the ships along for safe passage.

Sharon

It’s funny how a satin-lined box languishing in the bottom drawer, containing six silver cake forks, can bring back so many vivid memories of family celebrations; of laughing at the old-fashioned-ness of them, even all those years ago. But here they are – still in the family, still a source of wonder. I might have to organise a tea party!

Tim

When it comes to cakes, nothing says old-fashioned quite like that perennial favourite, the Neenish tart. Simple. Refined. Delicate. A fluffy, creamy centre, under the slightly brittle surface of the icing. Other cakes have come and gone, but the Neenish tart stands proud atop a pile of once-trendy cronuts, unicorn cupcakes, and chia puddings. Excuse me, I’ll be back in a minute – I’m suddenly hungry…

Next week…

Our week 9 theme is: The letter D…

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21 thoughts on “Week 8: Old fashioned/Vintage”

      1. My mam worked in a drapery shop many years ago. She said this ribbon was used quite a lot. As a type of binding. It secured seams. Sometimes on the insides of dresses and cushion covers. I’ve often seen it used as a decorative seam on an apron or as a drawstring. I bet if you look in your home you will find it somewhere! These days it is more often called twill tape.

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